Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Whole baked labna barramundi with dukkah recipe


The Arabic Food Recipes Kitchen (The home of Delicious Arabic Food) invites you to try Whole baked labna barramundi with dukkah recipe. Enjoy the Arabic cuisine and learn how to make Whole baked labna barramundi with dukkah.

The unusual combination of labna and fish will surprise you with its delicious flavour. Labna is strained yoghurt, traditionally eaten for breakfast in Lebanese cuisine. Dukkah is a Moroccan spice and nut mixture. Chef Hassan M’Souli from Out of Africa restaurant talks us through how to bake fish with these complex spices and textures.

Serves 4
Preparation 45min
Cooking 30min
Skill level Easy

By
Hassan M’Souli


Ingredients

100 g
 (3½ oz) blanched almonds
2 kg whole barramundi, cleaned, scaled, at room temperature
1 tsp
 sea salt
1 tbsp 
freshly ground white pepper
¼ cup
 extra virgin olive oil
½ 
preserved lemon, chopped

garlic cloves, crushed
1
red onion, peeled, chopped
½ bunch
 coriander (cilantro), finely chopped, plus extra to garnish
2 tbsp 
dukkah
1 cup 
labna
1 tbsp
 sesame seeds, toasted
red or green harissa and salad to serve


Cook's notes

Oven temperatures are for conventional; if using fan-forced (convection), reduce the temperature by 20˚C. | We use Australian tablespoons and cups: 1 teaspoon equals 5 ml; 1 tablespoon equals 20 ml; 1 cup equals 250 ml. | All herbs are fresh (unless specified) and cups are lightly packed. | All vegetables are medium size and peeled, unless specified. | All eggs are 55-60 g, unless specified.


Instructions

The following recipe has been tested and edited by SBS Food and may differ slightly from the podcast.

Roast the almonds under a hot oven grill for 7 minutes, or until browned. Chop roughly. Turn off grill and adjust oven to 180°C (350°F) or gas mark 4.

In a bowl, stir the preserved lemon with 2 tbsp olive oil, garlic, onion, coriander, dukkah and remaining salt and pepper. Continue stirring and add the almonds and labna to create a thick paste.

Season the fish with half of the salt and pepper, drizzle with the remaining olive oil and wrap in baking paper. Place the wrapped fish on an oven tray and bake for 35 minutes, or until almost cooked through. Peel the skin from the barramundi on the side facing up and spread the labna paste over the exposed flesh and cover with baking paper. Place back into the oven for a further 5-10 minutes, or until just cooked through.

Serve on a large plate. Sprinkle with sesame seeds and coriander sprigs, serve with red or green harissa and salad.


Note
• Labna is available from Middle-eastern delicatessens, or make your own by draining 2 ½ cups Greek-style yoghurt in slightly dampened and wrung out piece of muslin. Tie into a moneybag style sack and hang in refrigerator with a bowl underneath to catch dripping liquid for 24hrs.
 

Source sbs.com.au
Photography by Alan Benson. Styling by Michelle Noerianto.
 

More Arabic Food Recipes:

Baked snapper with chermoula
Chicken and Mushrooms with Couscous
Fish and couscous parcels  
Couscous tabouli and beef salad     
Shawarma Lamb with Couscous Salad 
Chicken and pumpkin tagine 
 
Save and share Whole baked labna barramundi with dukkah recipe

Want to share this recipe with your family and friends? Click the button below to send them an email or save this to your favorite social network.

Baked snapper with chermoula recipe


The Arabic Food Recipes Kitchen (The home of Delicious Arabic Food) invites you to try Baked snapper with chermoula recipe. Enjoy the Arabic cuisine and learn how to make Baked snapper with chermoula.

Out of Africa chef Hassan M’Souli reveals how to prepare the classic Moroccan dishes of chermoula and tomato salsa. He uses them both in a colourful and flavour-packed baked snapper dish.

Serves 4-6
Preparation 30min
Cooking 30min
Skill level Easy

By
Hassan M'souli


Ingredients

1½-2 kg
 (3-4 lb) whole snapper, cleaned and scaled
1 cup chermoula marinade
2 sticks celery, sliced on a long angle
2 
small ripe tomatoes, sliced
1 small red onion, peeled and sliced into rings
1 green capsicum (bell pepper), seeded and sliced into rings
¼ preserved lemon, sliced finely
12 green olives
tomato salsa and harissa, to serve

Chermoula

1 tbsp
 dried crushed chilli
1 tbsp 
sweet paprika
1 tbsp 
ground cumin
1 tsp 
finely chopped ginger
½ tsp 
saffron threads
2 
onions, finely diced
2
 garlic cloves, chopped
2
 fresh bay leaves
2 tbsp
 chopped flat-leaf parsley
2 tbsp 
chopped coriander (cilantro)
½
 preserved lemon, thinly sliced
125 ml
 (½ cup) olive oil
½
 lemon, juiced

Tomato salsa

4 
ripe tomatoes, blanched, seeded, diced
1
 Lebanese cucumber, seeded, diced
½ 
red onion, diced
1
 garlic clove, crushed
2 tbsp
 chopped coriander (cilantro)
1 tbsp 
olive oil
2 tsp 
lemon juice
1 tsp
 ground cumin
salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Harissa

500 g 
(1 lb) small hot red chillies, stalks removed (or use long red chillies for a less fiery result)
2 
large red capsicums (bell peppers), roasted, peeled
1
 preserved lemon
3
 garlic cloves
⅓ bunch 
coriander (cilantro), finely chopped
2 tbsp
 ground cumin
1 tsp 
salt
olive oil, to cover

Cook's notes

Oven temperatures are for conventional; if using fan-forced (convection), reduce the temperature by 20˚C. | We use Australian tablespoons and cups: 1 teaspoon equals 5 ml; 1 tablespoon equals 20 ml; 1 cup equals 250 ml. | All herbs are fresh (unless specified) and cups are lightly packed. | All vegetables are medium size and peeled, unless specified. | All eggs are 55-60 g, unless specified.
 

Instructions

The following recipe has been tested and edited by SBS Food and may differ slightly from the podcast.

Marinating time 1 hour

To make the chermoula, combine all the ingredients thoroughly, then stand for 30 minutes to allow the flavours to develop. Serve alongside or stirred through beef, chicken or seafood dishes. This recipe will make 3 cups. The chermoula can be stored in the refrigerator for up to 7 days.

To make the tomato salsa, combine all the ingredients in a bowl. Season with salt and pepper.

To make the harissa, mince the chillies, roast capsicums, preserved lemon and garlic by hand or in a food processor. Mix with the coriander (cilantro), cumin and salt until well combined. Let the mixture stand for 1 hour, then transfer to a preserving jar and cover with oil. Store indefinitely in the refrigerator.

To prepare the fish, score 3 or 4 diagonal cuts into the thickest part of the fish. Rub two-thirds of the chermoula marinade all over the fish, inside and out. Cover and marinate at room temperature for 1 hour.
  
Preheat oven to 230°C (450°F/Gas 8). Place sliced celery into the bottom of a large baking tray (or tajine). Lay the fish on the celery, and arrange the tomatoes, onion, capsicum (bell pepper), preserved lemon and olives on top.
  
Spoon the remaining chermoula marinade over the fish, cover tightly with foil and bake for 15 minutes.
  
Reduce the heat to 150°C (300°F/Gas 2), remove foil and bake for a further 15-20 minutes, or until fish is just cooked.
  
Serve the fish with the tomato salsa and harissa on the side.
 

Source sbs.com.au
Photography by Alan Benson. Styling by Michelle Noerianto.
 

More Arabic Food Recipes:

Chicken and Mushrooms with Couscous
Fish and couscous parcels
Couscous tabouli and beef salad   
Shawarma Lamb with Couscous Salad 
Chicken and pumpkin tagine 
Chickpea tagine   
 
Save and share Baked snapper with chermoula recipe

Want to share this recipe with your family and friends? Click the button below to send them an email or save this to your favorite social network.

Sunday, November 16, 2014

Sesame kaak recipe


The Arabic Food Recipes Kitchen (The home of Delicious Arabic Food) invites you to try Sesame kaak recipe. Enjoy the Arabic cuisine and learn how to make Sesame kaak.

Here's a recipe for Arabic ring-shaped bread covered in sesame seeds. They're as common to Lebanon as bagels in NYC. Enjoy them plain as an afternoon snack or with cheese, za'atar and baked eggs.

Serves 10-12
Preparation 30min
Cooking 30min
Skill level Mid

By
Norma Attieh

Ingredients

500 g self-raising flour
¾ cup (165 g) caster sugar
½ tsp ground mahleb (see Note) (also known as mahlab or aniseed)
½ tsp baking powder (optional)
1 egg, plus 1 extra for egg wash
½ cup (125 ml) milk, room temperature
125 g unsalted butter, softened
½ cup sesame seeds

Cook's notes

Oven temperatures are for conventional; if using fan-forced (convection), reduce the temperature by 20˚C. | We use Australian tablespoons and cups: 1 teaspoon equals 5 ml; 1 tablespoon equals 20 ml; 1 cup equals 250 ml. | All herbs are fresh (unless specified) and cups are lightly packed. | All vegetables are medium size and peeled, unless specified. | All eggs are 55-60 g, unless specified.
Instructions

The following recipe has been tested and edited by SBS Food and may differ slightly from the podcast.

Preheat oven to 200˚C. Line two large, flat oven trays with baking paper.

In a large mixing bowl, combine flour, sugar, mahleb or aniseed and baking powder (if using). Make a well in the centre and add in the egg, milk and butter. Mix the dough gently until it just comes together. Beat the extra egg in a small bowl for egg wash.

Start making the biscuits by rolling small amounts (a slightly rounded tablespoon measure) of dough into logs, about 15 cm long. Curl some pieces into rings, lightly brushing with egg wash between the join to help seal. Fold the remaining pieces in half, then twist together to braid. Place onto lined oven trays, leaving a small gap between each.

Place sesame seeds into a bowl, brush the top of the biscuits well with egg wash, then scatter with sesame seeds. Bake for 10 minutes, or until the biscuits turns the colour of light honey. Remove from oven and place biscuits on a cooling rack.

Store biscuits in airtight containers and give some to family and friends!

Note
• Mahleb (mahlab) is a spice from the dried and ground seed of a particular variety of cherry.

Photography by Alan Benson. Styling by Michelle Noerianto. Food preparation by Nick Banbury. 


More Arabic Food Recipes:

Broiled Filo Rounds
Rice with Chicken and Tomatoes Recipe
Bokhari Rice Recipe
Lentil Rice with Meat & Carrots Recipe
Peas with rice (Bazella W Riz) Recipe
Chicken and Rice Recipe


Save and share Sesame kaak recipe

Want to share this recipe with your family and friends? Click the button below to send them an email or save this to your favorite social network.

Saturday, November 15, 2014

Baked kibbeh (kibbeh bil sayneeyeh) recipe

 
The Arabic Food Recipes Kitchen (The home of Delicious Arabic Food) invites you to try Baked kibbeh (kibbeh bil sayneeyeh) recipe. Enjoy the Arabic cuisine and learn how to make Baked kibbeh (kibbeh bil sayneeyeh) recipe.

Kibbeh, the national dish of Lebanon, is an emulsification of the freshest minced lamb and burghul (cracked wheat), with essential "seven spices" (baharat). In the old days, Lebanese women would pound the meat and burghul in a mortar and pestle, then knead in the spices, a process which can be excruciatingly exhausting. Kibbeh can be eaten raw (kibbeh naye). It’s similar to steak tartare and popular in Lebanon. Another common form is kibbeh qrass, whereby the kibbeh mixture is molded into small, hollowed balls, stuffed with filling and then fried. This recipe is kibbeh bil sayneeye, or baked kibbeh.


Serves 12
Preparation 25min
Cooking 1hr
Skill level Mid


By
Bethany Kehdy


Ingredients

1 large onion, quartered
1 kg minced lamb (see Note)
350 g very fine burghul, soaked in water for 1 hour, drained
¼ cup baharat or allspice (see Note)
2 tsp ground nutmeg
2 tsp ground cinnamon
2 tbsp salt
olive oil, for drizzling
fattoush salad, to serve

Filling

1 tbsp ghee or olive oil
2 large onions, cut into rings
80 g pine nuts
500 g minced lamb (see note)
1 tbsp baharat or allspice (see Note)
salt and pepper, to season

Yoghurt dressing

500 g Greek-style yoghurt
60 ml (¼ cup) water
2 garlic cloves, pounded to a paste
1 large cucumber, thinly sliced
20 mint leaves, finely chopped
1 tsp lemon juice
salt, to season 


Cook's notes

Oven temperatures are for conventional; if using fan-forced (convection), reduce the temperature by 20˚C. | We use Australian tablespoons and cups: 1 teaspoon equals 5 ml; 1 tablespoon equals 20 ml; 1 cup equals 250 ml. | All herbs are fresh (unless specified) and cups are lightly packed. | All vegetables are medium size and peeled, unless specified. | All eggs are 55-60 g, unless specified.
 

Instructions

Makes 4

Soaking time 1 hour

To make the yoghurt dressing, combine all the ingredients in a bowl. Cover and refrigerate until needed.

To make the filling, place a large frying pan over medium heat. Add the olive oil and onions and cook for 2–3 minutes or until soft. Add the pine nuts and cook for another 2–3 minutes or until almost golden. Now add the minced lamb and cook for 7–8 minutes or until browned. Stir in the spice and season with salt and pepper.

To make the kibbeh paste, place the quartered onions in a food processor and process until almost pureed. Add the minced lamb, one-quarter at a time, and combine well. Now add the drained burghul, 1 cup at a time, and process until well combined. Add the spices and salt, and give it a final whiz, about 2-3 minutes. The result should be a smooth emulsified paste.

Preheat the oven 180˚C. Divide the kibbeh paste into 8 even portions. Lightly grease 4 x 21 cm round baking dishes and evenly spread 1 portion of the kibbeh paste over the base of each dish. Evenly spread the meat filling on top. Now cover with 1 portion of the remaining kibbeh paste, creating a final layer. Using a knife, cut diagonal lines into the top layer, creating diamond shapes, then divide into 6 even slices. Create a small hole in the centre and drizzle all over with the olive oil (this gives it a nice golden brown colour as well as adding a bit of flavour).

Pop in the oven and cook for 45 minutes or until golden brown. Alternatively, pop it under the grill for the last 6–8 minutes for an extra-crispy top layer.

Pour the yoghurt dressing over each slice and serve with fattoush salad.

Note
• Ask your butcher for lamb mince made from the leg of lamb.
• Baharat (also known as seven spices) is a Lebanese spice mixture available from Middle Eastern food shops. Or use even proportions of ground black pepper, cloves, ginger, cinnamon, coriander, cardamom and cumin.

Recipe from Dirty Kitchen Secrets by Bethany Kehdy, with photographs by Sarka Babicka.
 

More Arabic Food Recipes:

Chargrilled garlic chicken (farrouj meshwi)
Fragrant lamb kebabs
Spicy Lamb Kebab
Shish Taouk 
Sumac kebabs on couscous tabouli 
Lamb kebabs with couscous and mint-yoghurt sauce   

Save and share Baked kibbeh (kibbeh bil sayneeyeh) recipe

Want to share this recipe with your family and friends? Click the button below to send them an email or save this to your favorite social network.
 

Wednesday, November 12, 2014

Chargrilled garlic chicken (farrouj meshwi) recipe


The Arabic Food Recipes Kitchen (The home of Delicious Arabic Food) invites you to try Chargrilled garlic chicken (farrouj meshwi) recipe. Enjoy the Arabic cuisine and learn how to make Chargrilled garlic chicken (farrouj meshwi).

This succulent chicken is often barbecued over charcoal for extra smokiness. With the lemony flavour of sumac, it’s the marinade that makes this Lebanese dish such a crowd-pleaser.

Serves 4
Preparation 15min
Cooking 35min
Skill level Mid

By
Phoebe Wood

Ingredients

1.5kg whole chicken, butterflied (see Note)
toum (Lebanese garlic sauce), Lebanese pickled vegetables and chillies, and pita bread, to serve (see Note)

Marinade

½ tsp cayenne pepper
1½ tsp paprika
1 tsp ground cumin
1 tbsp sumac
⅛ tsp ground cinnamon
6 garlic cloves, crushed
80 ml (⅓ cup) lemon juice
80 ml (⅓ cup) olive oil

Cook's notes

Oven temperatures are for conventional; if using fan-forced (convection), reduce the temperature by 20˚C. | We use Australian tablespoons and cups: 1 teaspoon equals 5 ml; 1 tablespoon equals 20 ml; 1 cup equals 250 ml. | All herbs are fresh (unless specified) and cups are lightly packed. | All vegetables are medium size and peeled, unless specified. | All eggs are 55-60 g, unless specified.


Instructions

Marinating time overnight

To make marinade, combine all ingredients in a large, non-reactive bowl. Add chicken and turn to coat. Cover bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight.

Preheat oven to 200°C. Heat a barbecue or chargrill pan to medium-high. Season chicken generously with salt, then cook, turning once, for 8 minutes or until charred and golden brown.

Transfer to a lined oven tray and roast for 25 minutes or until cooked through.

Carve into large pieces and serve with toum, pickles and bread.

Notes

• To butterfly a chicken: Place chicken, breast-side down, with the neck facing you. Using kitchen scissors or a sharp knife, slice along either side of backbone and discard. Cut off neck and discard. Turn chicken over and firmly press down with your hands to pop any joints and flatten. Alternatively, ask your butcher to do this for you

• Toum (Lebanese garlic sauce) is available from select delis and Middle Eastern food shops.

• Lebanese pickled vegetables and chillies are from Middle Eastern food shops.

Photography Brett Stevens

As seen in Feast magazine, November 2014, Issue 37. For more recipes and articles, pick up a copy of this month's Feast magazine or check out our great subscriptions offers here.

More Arabic Food Recipes:


Fragrant lamb kebabs
Spicy Lamb Kebab
Shish Taouk 
Sumac kebabs on couscous tabouli 
Lamb kebabs with couscous and mint-yoghurt sauce   
Beef kebabs with yoghurt & mint 

Save and share Chargrilled garlic chicken (farrouj meshwi) recipe

Want to share this recipe with your family and friends? Click the button below to send them an email or save this to your favorite social network.

Tomato and pomegranate salad recipe


The Arabic Food Recipes Kitchen (The home of Delicious Arabic Food) invites you to try Tomato and pomegranate salad recipe. Enjoy the Arabic cuisine and learn how to make Tomato and pomegranate salad.

I rarely rave about my own recipes but this is one I can just go on and on about. The definition of freshness with its sweet and sour late-summer flavours, it is also an utter delight to look at. But the most incredible thing about it is that it uses a few ingredients that I have been lovingly cooking with for many years, and believed I knew everything there was to know about, yet had never thought of mixing them in such a way. That is, until I travelled to Istanbul and came across a similar combination of fresh tomatoes and pomegranate seeds in a famous local kebab restaurant called Hamdi, right by the Spice Bazaar. It was a proper light-bulb moment when I realised how the two types of sweetness – the sharp, almost bitter sweetness of pomegranate and the savoury, sunny sweetness of tomato – can complement each other so gloriously. I use four types of tomato here to make the salad more interesting visually and in flavour. You can easily use fewer, just as long as they are ripe and sweet.

Serves 4
Preparation 15min
Skill level Easy

By
Yotam Ottolenghi
 

Ingredients

200 g red cherry tomatoes, cut into 0.5 cm dice
200 g yellow cherry tomatoes, cut into 0.5 cm dice
200 g tiger (or plum) tomatoes, cut into 0.5 cm dice
500 g medium vine tomatoes, cut into 0.5 cm dice
1 red pepper, cut into 0.5 cm dice (120 g)
1 small red onion, finely diced (120 g)
2 garlic cloves, crushed
½ tsp ground allspice
2 tsp white wine vinegar
25 ml pomegranate molasses
60 ml olive oil, plus a little extra to finish
seeds of 1 large pomegranate (170 g)
¾ tbsp small oregano leaves
salt

Cook's notes

Oven temperatures are for conventional; if using fan-forced (convection), reduce the temperature by 20˚C. | We use Australian tablespoons and cups: 1 teaspoon equals 5 ml; 1 tablespoon equals 20 ml; 1 cup equals 250 ml. | All herbs are fresh (unless specified) and cups are lightly packed. | All vegetables are medium size and peeled, unless specified. | All eggs are 55-60 g, unless specified.
 

Instructions

Mix together the tomatoes, red pepper (capsicum) and onion in a large bowl and set aside.

In a small bowl whisk the garlic, allspice, vinegar, pomegranate molasses, olive oil and ⅓ teaspoon of salt, until well combined. Pour this over the tomatoes and gently mix.

Arrange the tomatoes and their juices on a large flat plate. Sprinkle over the pomegranate seeds and oregano. Finish with a drizzle of olive oil and serve.

Recipe from Plenty More by Yotam Ottolenghi (Ebury Press, $49.99, hbk). Photography by Jonathan Lovekin.
 
 

More Arabic Food Recipes: 

Sumac spiced calamari with freekeh, preserved lemon and broad bean salad 
Shrimp Biryani
Chicken biryani 
Lamb Shank Okra Tajine
Lamb Rack With Maghrabia Biryani (served with Torlly)
Iraqi Biryani 


Save and share Tomato and pomegranate salad recipe

Want to share this recipe with your family and friends? Click the button below to send them an email or save this to your favorite social network.

Tuesday, November 11, 2014

Places to Eat Ice Cream

Globe-trotters can experience flavors that go far beyond the standard chocolate, vanilla, or strawberry. Experience eel ice cream in Japan or green tea in Florence.

Capogiro, a Philadelphia gelateria, has unusual flavors of the smooth treat, handcrafted each day.
Photograph courtesy Capogiro

From the National Geographic book Food Journeys of a Lifetime

1. Capogiro Gelato, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Made with the freshest ingredients (such as milk from Amish grass-fed cows), the artisan gelatos and sorbettos handcrafted each day at Capogiro Gelato include flavors not seen anywhere else—Madagascar bourbon vanilla, melograno (pomegranate), nocciola Piemonte (hazelnut), Saigon cinnamon, Thai coconut milk (with a dash of rum), and zucca (long-neck pumpkin).
Planning: Capogiro has four cafés in Philadelphia.
 

2. Ted Drewes Frozen Custard, St. Louis, Missouri

Made from fresh cream, eggs, and sugar, frozen custard is a midwestern dessert that looks, tastes, and acts like its close cousin, ice cream. The stand on Grand Boulevard has been open since 1931, serving frozen custard in cones, shakes, root-beer floats, and house specialties, such as Hawaiian Delight and Crater Copernicus.
Planning: Drewes has several locations in St. Louis.
 

3. Bombay Ice Creamery, San Francisco, California

Some of the planet’s best Indian ice cream can be sampled here, in the Hispanic Mission District. On offer are flavors such as chiku (sapodilla), cardamom, chai-tea, saffron, rose, and ginger, rarely found beyond the Indian subcontinent. Traditional kulfi (a frozen milk dessert) is also on the menu, plus lassi (yogurt drinks).
Planning: The opening hours change with the seasons, so check before planning a visit.
 

4. Devon House, Kingston, Jamaica

Built in the late 19th century as the home of Jamaica’s first black millionaire, Devon House is a masterpiece of Caribbean Victorian architecture and home to the island’s most celebrated ice-cream stand. The 27 flavors run a broad gamut from traditional cherry and pistachio to exotic island treats like mango, coconut, and soursop. There is even an offbeat, beer-based ice cream called Devon Stout. Grab a cone and recline in the sprawling gardens.
Planning: Devon House is in central Kingston. Admission includes a tour of the house and access to the gardens.
 

5. Helados Scannapieco, Buenos Aires, Argentina

This tiny, no-frills shop seems little changed from 1938, when Italian immigrants Andres and Josefina Scannapieco first opened the doors. Members of the Scannapieco clan still make ice cream the way the family have for 70 years. The menu runs 50 flavors deep, from chocolate and vanilla to other delights, such as durazno (peach), canela (cinnamon), lemon champagne, and caipirinha (a Brazilian cocktail made with cachaça and lime).
Planning: Helados Scannapieco is at Avenida Córdoba 4826 in the Palermo district.
6. Ice Cream City, Tokyo, Japan
With dozens of stands selling more than 300 flavors between them, Tokyo’s appropriately named Ice Cream City offers some of the planet’s more unusual ice creams, from soy chicken and orchid root to sea-island salt and unagi (eel). If you have more conventional tastes, Italian gelato and American ice cream sundaes are also available.
Planning: Ice Cream City is part of the food-themed section of the Namja Town amusement park in the Sunshine City shopping complex 15 minutes’ walk from Ikebukuro station.
 

7. Glacé, Sydney, Australia

Glacé is celebrated for its cutting-edge, ice-cream-based desserts, such as bombe Alaska, checkerboard terrines, and chocolate-dipped petit fours. Rose petal, vanilla bean, strawberry pistachio, and Belgian chocolate count among its signature flavors.
Planning: Glacé has one retail outlet, at 27 Marion Street in Sydney’s Leichhardt district.
 

8. A’jia Hotel, Istanbul, Turkey

There is nothing more romantic than a summer evening beside the Bosporus, especially when you are having ice cream on the outdoor terrace of the A’jia Hotel. The dessert menu includes fried vanilla ice cream, passionfruit sorbet, and traditional Turkish dondurma (ice cream) made from goats’ milk.
Planning: Located on the western shore of the Bosporus, the A’jia is a 19th-century mansion transformed into a hip new waterfront hangout.
 

9. Vaffelbageriet, Copenhagen, Denmark

Tivoli Gardens amusement park is the venue for this century-old ice-cream outlet. The specialty is ice cream served in a large waffle cone, called the Amerikaner, which takes up to four scoops plus syrupy topping, whipped cream, and chocolate-covered meringue puff (rather than a maraschino cherry).
Planning: Tivoli Gardens is in central Copenhagen, and is open from mid-April through late September. The entertainments include concerts, rides, and 40 restaurants.
 

10. Perchè No!, Florence, Italy

Going since 1939, Perchè No!—Why not!—sells intensely flavored ice cream produced fresh on the premises each day. The selection varies, but favorites include honey and sesame seed, green tea, and a rich coffee crunch with pieces of chocolate. They also sell a wide assortment of fruit sorbets and granitas.
Planning: Perchè No! is in Via dei Tavolini, about two minutes’ walk from the Duomo.

Similar posts:


Places for Chocolate
Prada buys pastry shop  
Top 10 hotel restaurants in the world
Vongerichten to open new restaurant in Abu Dhabi 
Goring Hotel named London’s top afternoon tea place
Top 20 hostels in the world for food
 

Save and share Places to Eat Ice Cream

Want to share this article with your family and friends? Click the button below to send them an email or save this to your favorite social network.

Addthis social buttons

LinkWithin

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...